Ocriplasmin for symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion

Full citation: Neffendorf JE, Kirthi V, Pringle E, Jackson TL. Ocriplasmin for symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2017, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD011874. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011874.pub2

What is the aim of this review?
 
The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out how well ocriplasmin works in the treatment of symptomatic vitreomacular adhesion (sVMA). Cochrane Review authors collected and analysed all relevant studies to answer this question and found four studies.

Key messages 
People with sVMA treated with ocriplasmin have an increased chance of release of sVMA and improved vision compared with people who are not treated with ocriplasmin (high-certainty evidence). They are also probably less likely to require surgery, but one in five people with sVMA treated with ocriplasmin will probably still require surgery at a later date to treat sVMA (moderate-certainty evidence).

What was studied in the review
People with sVMA treated with ocriplasmin have an increased chance of release of sVMA and improved vision compared with people who are not treated with ocriplasmin (high-certainty evidence). They are also probably less likely to require surgery, but one in five people with sVMA treated with ocriplasmin will probably still require surgery at a later date to treat sVMA (moderate-certainty evidence).

What are the main results of the review
Cochrane Review authors found four studies that compared ocriplasmin with control (sham or placebo treatment) for the treatment of sVMA. All four studies were sponsored by the manufacturers of ocriplasmin.

The review showed that:

• ocriplasmin increases the chance of sVMA resolution compared with no treatment (high-certainty evidence);
• people with sVMA treated with ocriplasmin have improved vision compared with people who are not treated with ocriplasmin (high-certainty evidence);
• treatment with ocriplasmin probably reduces the requirement for surgery, but approximately one in five people treated with ocriplasmin may require further surgery at a later date (moderate-certainty evidence);
• there were more ocular adverse events in eyes treated with ocriplasmin than control (sham or placebo injection) treatment.

How up-to-date is this review
Cochrane Review authors searched for studies that had been published up to 24 February 2017.